Weekend Reading – Renovation edition

Planning a home renovation?  Have a home renovation underway?  We do.  This week, after months of saving, selecting a contractor, picking out new bathroom fixtures, and purchase and delivery of a new vanity our main bathroom renovation is in full swing.  Out with the old and in with the new as they say.  Here is the old:

Main Bath

What will the new look like?  Stay tuned to my blog over the next week or so and maybe you’ll find out.

Later tonight after the mud on the drywall is, well, dry, we will be sanding and prepping the walls for paint.  Hopefully we’ll be able to put one good coat on the walls before the contractor arrives tomorrow.   That coat should go on before midnight…at the time of this post, the walls are still damp.  By this time tomorrow, we expect most of this renovation will be complete.  Potentially one more coat of paint but that should do it.  There are always surprises with renovations but I will remain positive. 🙂

Have you undergone any recent home renovations?  Did you do it yourself?

With getting the bathroom ready for this renovation at night and working during the day, I didn’t have as much time to read personal finance or investing blogs this week – but I did make an effort to check out a few.  I hope you enjoy what I found in the following Weekend Reading list.

Lastly, thanks to all my followers and subscribers – you’ve recently pushed my email subscriptions over 1,000!   If you don’t already receive my updates via email please subscribe here since Google Reader will disappear in a couple of months for good.

Renos or not, enjoy your weekend!

Avrex Money created one of the best tables I’ve seen on a blog, listing the entire S&P TSX Composite Index where you can sort, search and filter by dividend yield, dividend payout ratio, 3-year and 5-year dividend averages.

101 Centavos said you can add thousands to the value of your home for just $100, doing this.

Dividend Growth Investor provided a list of article on this site since it began.

Prairie EcoThrifter said she prefers experiences over buying things.

Retire Happy provided some investing basics.

Not related to personal finance or investing at all, Google had some fun on April 1st.   On a similar playful note, Dan Bortolotti informed us his site was threatened by legal action.  Bob Loblaw definitely has it out for him.

Kathy Clough reminded us to file our personal taxes by the April 30th deadline, so not to incur any penalties.

Million Dollar Journey continued his awesome net worth ascent.

Passive Income Earner shared some great stock screening tools.

Glenn Cooke had a comprehensive series about life insurance on his site, reminding you to challenge your assumptions before you buy any insurance products.  Check out Glenn’s interesting experiment in Part 1 of 4 here.   You can read about the life insurance policies of some Canadian financial bloggers including yours truly, in Part 2 of 4 here.

Big Cajun Man said being debt free might buy happiness.

Financial Uproar released the Q1 results of his stock picking contest.  I’m in sixth place.

Boomer & Echo answered a reader question – are bonds a safe investment?

The Financial Blogger fell on his sword – a Mea Culpa when it comes to accounting for his corporation.

Grocery Alerts wanted to let you know about a Healthy Shoppers Giveaway.

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7 Responses to "Weekend Reading – Renovation edition"

  1. “months of saving” Glad this was one of the first things you mention in this post. Sometimes when we want to big ticket items or nice renos we are tempted to charge it or make monthly instalments. It’s a wise decision to save for your reno!

    Reply
    1. Hey Pat!

      Yeah, our plan is almost always to save first, then buy. That’s for renos, trips, things we want for the house, etc. You don’t get it until we know we have the funds in our account to pay for it. It’s just the way we work.

      Reply

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