Stock Investing for Canadians – Review and Giveaway

Stock Investing for Canadians – Review and Giveaway

“The basics of stock investing are so elementary that few people recognize them. When you lose track of the basics or first principles, you lose track of why you invested to begin with.”  – Stock Investing for Canadians.

I couldn’t agree more.  And this book from the Wiley family may help you out.

Fans and supporters of this site, Wiley, recently sent me the latest edition of Stock Investing for Canadians to highlight and giveaway to one lucky reader.

Stock Investing for Canadians

Before you enter the raffle, here is an overview of some of the chapters and what you’ll learn about:

  • Taking Stock of Your Financial Situation and Goals – learn about why emergency funds are important; understand your debt or liabilities; calculate your net worth; analyze your personal balance sheet – even before you think about investing.

This reminds me of this post here – before investing – do these three things!

  • Common Approaches to Stock Investing – this book isn’t about selecting junior mining stocks to trade, although it does have a section about short-term investing = speculation!  Rather, consider investing for a purpose:  for income; for growth; or both – so that approach is aligned to your personal style for better results.
  • Recognizing Risk and Volatility – you’ll learn about market risk, inflation risk, liquidity risk, taxation risk, political risk and your own personal risk – to better prepare you for how and when to invest.
  • Investing in Canadian Exchange Traded Funds – for new investors, this is a great chapter to highlight that all ETFs are not created equal, and why these financial products differ from conventional mutual funds.

Find out what makes a great ETF and more on this page here.

  • Going for Brokers – a solid set of pages about discount brokerages in Canada, their role (i.e., to make money!), how to use them; what makes them different from a Robo-Advisor and much more.

If you’re new to investing, or you need some coaching and help to train your investing brain, a robo-advisor can certainly help.  Learn more here.

  • Investing for Income – you’ll learn about dividends (although you have my site already for FREE!), you’ll learn more about “typical” income stocks like utility companies, Real Estate Investment Trusts (REITs), and more.

Want income from your portfolio and don’t want to be a landlord?  Own REITs like I do.

  • Chapters 11 and 12 – will dive deep into using accounting to choose stocks and how to decode a company financial report.

Beyond the above, you’ll learn about alternative currencies (should you really want to know?!), blockchain, peer-to-peer exchanges and more – although I personally wouldn’t advocate investing this way nor do I do it myself.

Summary

I prefer to keep things very simple in my portfolio, to the point of utter boredom.

Stock Investing for Canadians can certainly help new investors learn a number of important investing principles, “the basics” if you will, but it can also inform investors about what to avoid and definitely how not to invest.

Always remember, some financial professionals love complexity.  Why?  The biggest financial profits are usually derived from the most complicated, sophisticated product sold to the least knowledgeable investor.

Don’t be that person.

Enter to win a copy of Stock Investing for Canadians below and stay tuned to this channel to win other books before I downsize to a condo in the coming weeks.

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31 Responses to "Stock Investing for Canadians – Review and Giveaway"

      1. Hi Mark,

        I ran across Straight Talk on your money on your site. I think you probably know about Millionaire Teacher and Beat the Bank.

        Readers may be interested in The Wealthy Renter: a good primer for anyone considering renting or buying a residence – even if you think you’ve already crunched the numbers. Written in 2016 and analyses rental markets in Canada’s six largest cities then goes on to make a case for renting rather than buying a home. Author argues that often renting then saving and investing your money in stocks, ETFs and bonds makes more sense than buying a dwelling. This works if you save money, which is what many don’t do well.

        Reply
        1. Thanks for finding the site Al!

          Interesting book, thanks for the recommendation.

          I would agree based on the housing market in major cities, including where I live in Ottawa, renting may prove to be a much better way to provide shelter – thereby banking/investing the “renter’s dividend” from expenses not going into mortgage debt or home maintenance – and using those savings to build a significant nest egg instead.

          You’re bang on with the challenges many folks have though – renting or via home ownership – people can’t or don’t know how to save money.

          Thanks for your comment,
          Mark

          Reply
  1. I would love to have this book to share with my 22 yr old daughter & 18 year old son in order to get them more on board with investing & the beauty of compound interest. Love your site & have referred many to it. Your podcast is my favourite. I have learned so much from your honest, well directed & easy to understand information.

    Reply
        1. Thanks Henry for reaching out. I will do that when I get back from my vacation in Cornwall, England later this week. I have a few questions and will be emailing you soon.

          Reply
          1. Zeya: Made two trips to England in the late 90’s and really enjoyed it. Have a great trip.
            Glad to try and answer any questions.

  2. We just took all our savings out of IG and moved it to TD direct investing.
    This would be the perfect tool to educate ourselves before we start investing.

    Reply
  3. It’s great to see writers challenging the marketed complexity of investing. With brokers now available, it changes everything for the average consumer. For a possible savings of many many thousands of dollars, there lies the motivation to take the time to invest yourself to learn.

    Reply
  4. Would be a good read for one of my sons who needs a bit of guidance on the mechanics of portfolio design and selecting the appropriate etfs for a diversified portfolio.

    Reply
  5. The irony of investing for dummies has not passed me by. If people were wise we would pick good stocks and leave them alone but somehow we let fear and greed could our judgement. Always desiring to learn more. Appreciate the opportunity to win!

    Reply
  6. I want to win the giveaway because I have to plan for my disabled adult son’s future. We know we can’t count on the government for his future without us so we st least need to ensure he has the resources in place for his future without us. I know it sounds a bit doom and gloom but we need every resource we can find to leave him a good future.
    Thanks for your readings!@

    Reply

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