Weekend Reading – Roll up the RIM, giveaways and great blogs

Weekend Reading

Research In Motion Ltd. shares traded higher today following comments by Lenovo they might be looking to acquire the Waterloo-based company.  RIM is currently riding some major momentum of late, leading up to the launch of BB 10 in another few days.  Check out this chart for the last 3 months:

RIM

 

Will Lenovo go for it?  Will RIM be sold?   RIM definitely fell off of the stock market cliff a few years ago, since the stock price peaked at about $150 but as a Canadian, I’m cheering for it.  I hope this Made in Canada story gets better going forward and they have a great 2013.

I didn’t post as many articles as I wanted to this week, in large part due to some preparations for a few upcoming trips.  February is going to be a busy travel month me but I’ll do my best to post some articles when I can.   After the hectic month is over, I do have a few treats for you.

Thanks to my friends at Wiley I’ll giveaway a copy of How Much Is Enough?   I’ve just started to read Diane McCurdy’s book and I look forward to sharing the details with you in a blogpost and offering you a chance to win your copy from my site.

Later next month thanks to another partner of My Own Advisor, I’ll be giving away some FREE download codes for H&R Block tax software.  I’ll be doing a test-run of their software just in time for tax season and I’ll have an article about my findings as well.

While working a few priority projects at work, I did find some time to watch my Senators start the NHL season and get a shutout in the process, and oh yes….read a few personal finance blogs as well.   I’ve included my favourites from this week below.

It’s going to be -28 degrees Celsius with the windchill in Ottawa tonight so if any of that weather is the same where you are, stay nice and warm this weekend!

Take care readers and look for another article early next week.

Mark

 

A real estate guru shared his perspectives with Preet Banerjee on WhereDoesAllMyMoneyGo.com.

Canadian Capitalist said group RESP plans are loaded with fees.

Retire Happy asked what’s your financial motivator?   I have a couple 1) mortgage-free in 9 years and 2) achieving my dividend income goal in less than 15 years.  Then I will retire.

Dividend Ninja wondered if you have a plan.  Indeed I do.

Mr. CBB asked why houses are not sold.

The Money Puzzle shared lessons from the lunchroom.

There’s a clean new look over at Finance Fox!

BTI provided a forecast about PetroBakken Energy.

Michael James on Money walked us through an example for how to calculate investment returns.   I suspect this might be another indirect benefit to indexing your portfolio, less miniscule fees and excluding contributions or withdrawals made, you’ll always know what your portfolio returns are.

Financial Highway said you could tighten your belt and still have some fun.

Big Cajun Man wrote about lifestyle inflation.

Y&T mentioned how you can increase your productivity.

Boomer & Echo highlighted the heavy damage high mutual fund fees will have on your investment returns.

Stupid Cents wrote about good debt.

Prairie Eco-Thrifter wondered if insurance for your smartphone is a good idea.  It’s not for me.

Canadian Couch Potato questioned whether a 60/40 equity to bond allocation still makes sense.

Dividend Yield shared 20 solid stocks with a BUY rating.

Million Dollar Journey shared some thoughts about the optimal RRSP/TFSA contribution.  In the never-ending RRSP/TFSA debate, Ed Rempel on MDJ wrote:

“In general, if your taxable income is below $43,000 per year today, TFSA is probably better since you are in the lowest tax bracket. Your retirement tax bracket will be the same or higher. If you expect your taxable income after you retire to be very low (below $23,000 per year) or relatively high (above $70,000 per year) in today’s dollars, then TFSA is probably also better because you will be affected by the clawbacks of various government programs in addition to income tax.”

Larry Swedroe wondered if you should be an active investor in emerging markets.  Count me out.

Carl Richards wrote about the benefits of diversification in your portfolio.  He wrote about portfolio diversification this way:

Each type of investment plays a different role:  stocks provide the growth; short and intermediate bonds provide more safety and a little income; cash is there for liquidity and to protect your money.  “The idea is to balance these investments in a way that gives up some higher returns in exchange for lower overall risk. Essentially, you’ve given up the opportunity to hit home runs for the benefit of never striking out.”

Sustainable Personal Finance said if you’re a first time home buyer then get your finances in order.

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12 Responses to "Weekend Reading – Roll up the RIM, giveaways and great blogs"

  1. Hey Mark, I was wondering where you’ve been hiding out this week. Sounds like you have alot going on in the upcoming month. Are you going on vacation or is it work related? The codes for HandR Block is a great idea to giveaway. Have a great weekend mate. Cheers Mr.CBB

    Reply
  2. Hi Mark!
    Thanks for the inclusion.
    I’m happy to see RIM turning it around. Even though I’ve given up BB, I’m still cheering for them. Also, sounds like we’re both going to be traveling for part of Feb. I head out next week for 12 days.

    Reply
  3. Yay go RIM :0) I think they will surprise everyone with their new product launch next week. I don’t know if I want them to be sold yet but it would be interesting to see what happens to them. Technology is a fickle industry, and it changes so fast. Heck, just 10 years ago people probably wouldn’t have understood what that thing is in the middle of your “Weekend Reading” image at the top of your post :0)

    Reply
  4. Thanks for the mention. I may be misinterpreting your comment, but I don’t think it’s really any easier or harder to measure returns for indexed portfolios vs. active portfolios. As long as all the costs of investing come out of the investment account directly or indirectly, they don’t have to be explicitly accounted for in calculating your account’s return. All that matters is cash flows into and out of the account.

    Reply
    1. I dunno. You have a number of holdings like I do, and use of XIRR is a bit tricky. If you only have 2 or 3 index funds like Andrew Hallam, calculating your portfolio returns is easier I think.

      The more holdings you have, the more cash flows you need to keep track of.

      Reply
  5. Thanks for the mention Mark,

    Can’t wait for that cold wave to subside, so sick of the cold!

    As for RIM, I think the BB10 is too little too late. The market is a duo between andoird and ios. But hey, you never know 🙂

    Reply

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